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Author Topic: Concordia Accident - Not So Clear Cut?
Malcolm @ cruisepage
Cruise Director
Member # 301

posted 01-18-2012 10:03 AM      Profile for Malcolm @ cruisepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-16607837

(I'mot sure this link will work for non-uk viewers?)


Posts: 18982 | From: Essex (Just Outside London) | Registered: A Long Time Ago!  |  IP: Logged
Fairsky
First Class Passenger
Member # 781

posted 01-18-2012 10:54 AM      Profile for Fairsky   Email Fairsky   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is really important. I hate to admit this, but the Captain may have been telling the truth. He was following a route almost identical to the one previously approved by Costa. However, it remains to be seen whether or not his claim that the rocks were not on the charts is true.

This new evidence does not mean the Captain is innocent, it only means Costa may also be guilty of reckless navigation policies.

And nothing here changes the cowardly behavior of the captain after the accident, or the lack of order during the evacuation.


Posts: 1675 | From: Chicago, Illinois | Registered: Jul 99  |  IP: Logged
Malcolm @ cruisepage
Cruise Director
Member # 301

posted 01-18-2012 11:05 AM      Profile for Malcolm @ cruisepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Fairsky:
And nothing here changes the cowardly behavior of the captain after the accident, or the lack of order during the evacuation.

The guy was probably in 'shock' and may not have been mentally or physically capable of assisting the evacuation.

As I said before it is quite WRONG for Costa/Carnival to blame him BEFORE the inquiry. What happened to ‘innocent until proven guilty’?

Carnival were protecting their cruise product giving the Captain the full blame.

[ 01-18-2012: Message edited by: Malcolm @ cruisepage ]


Posts: 18982 | From: Essex (Just Outside London) | Registered: A Long Time Ago!  |  IP: Logged
Frosty 4
First Class Passenger
Member # 5826

posted 01-18-2012 11:23 AM      Profile for Frosty 4   Email Frosty 4   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If this guy is in shock having him under house arrest sitting in his home in Naples is NOT a good thing. He must be under extreme pressure.
He would have been better off in jail as he could be watched and monitored . I think you get my drift on this.
Frosty 4

Posts: 2450 | From: Illinois | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Fairsky
First Class Passenger
Member # 781

posted 01-18-2012 11:25 AM      Profile for Fairsky   Email Fairsky   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Malcolm,

"Innocent until proven guilty" is not part of Italian law. In fact, in Italy a suspect may be held in prison for up to 1 year before being formally accused or indicted.

Still, these facts appear undeniable:

1. The captain abandoned his ship before all passengers were evacuated. (Why he left is up for debate, but it was a violation of his duties.)

2. When ordered to return to the ship he did not.

3. No "Mayday" signal was issued by the captain that would have mobilized rescue boats earlier and possibly helped the evacuation.

4. Junior officers began mustering people to lifeboats BEFORE the order to abandon ship because they saw the severity of the situation. In other words, the captain seemed to be in denial and therefore delayed the order to evacuate.

5. Witnesses universally agree that the evacuation was disorderly, leaderless, and chaotic. Whether the captain's fault or the result of poorly trained crew, the cruise line is responsible.

6. Sailing close to Giglio had been pre-approved by the cruise line in the past, it was not authorized on Jan 13. The captain was in violation of cruise line policy when he deviated from the pre-determined course.


Posts: 1675 | From: Chicago, Illinois | Registered: Jul 99  |  IP: Logged
PRDM100480
First Class Passenger
Member # 4922

posted 01-18-2012 11:59 AM      Profile for PRDM100480   Email PRDM100480      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I quote the words of Capt. Robert Ward, Director, International Hydrographic Organization:
QUOTE :
No chart is infallible
- only reflects what is known and reported
What is a chart?
- it is an assumed model of the seafloor
- relies on remotely sensed data
- requires judgment to compile
- is difficult to verify
- may be incomplete
UNQUOTE

The reliability of a chart, whether it is a paper chart or an electronic chart should continuously be assessed by the navigation staff.


Posts: 16 | From: USA | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
jeffrossatsea
First Class Passenger
Member # 2962

posted 01-18-2012 01:44 PM      Profile for jeffrossatsea   Email jeffrossatsea   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i agree with Frosty4...he knows he is in big trouble and the responsibilities he had to the ship and everyone on board...he should be monitored incase he takes his life...thats my feeling
Posts: 1052 | From: vancouver | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Globaliser
First Class Passenger
Member # 4153

posted 01-18-2012 02:11 PM      Profile for Globaliser     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Fairsky:
"Innocent until proven guilty" is not part of Italian law.
I would be surprised if this were true. Italy is as much subject to the European Convention on Human Rights as the UK, and the Convention requires a presumption of innocence in criminal proceedings.

I agree entirely with your point that the events that caused the accident, and the captain's part in them, must be looked at separately from the actions of the captain following the accident and in the management of the evacuation. In the rush to judgement, many people are overlooking this crucial distinction.

Indeed, there are even different parts to the subsequent events: it seems at least theoretically possible that the captain's decision (if that is what it was) to sit the ship on the ledge to stop her fully sinking into deep water may have saved lives, even if it is later proved that he was thereafter more concerned about saving his own skin than about the welfare of his passengers.


Posts: 1828 | From: UK | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
FL_Cruiser64
First Class Passenger
Member # 13706

posted 01-18-2012 10:05 PM      Profile for FL_Cruiser64   Email FL_Cruiser64   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Not sure where the problem lies with arresting the captain. He was charged with manslaughter and abandoning the ship. And he was jailed.

Happens in every country with a fair criminal justice system.

It's not like he was send to prison for 20 years in the absence of a fair trial.


Posts: 216 | From: Florida | Registered: Feb 2008  |  IP: Logged
Tom Burke
First Class Passenger
Member # 5238

posted 01-19-2012 02:18 AM      Profile for Tom Burke   Author's Homepage   Email Tom Burke   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Until we see really detailed charts and can see the two tracks (last Friday's and last August's) plotted on it, we won't know.

That said, I have a feeling that distance from the island opposite the harbour entrance won't turn out to be critical - I think there is deep water there (that's why the harbour is located there). What's critical, I think, is the area to the south of the harbour; and even on the small-scale diagrams we already have, last Friday the ship appears to be going closer to the island in that area then she did in August. I can imagine that in August although she tucked in closer to the island opposite the harbour entrance, that was safe; but her approach on that occasion kept her further away from the dangerous area to the south.


Posts: 1469 | From: Sheffield, UK | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
desirod7
First Class Passenger
Member # 1626

posted 01-21-2012 01:26 PM      Profile for desirod7     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

Posts: 5678 | From: Philadelphia, Pa [home of the SS United States] | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged
LeBarryboat
First Class Passenger
Member # 5308

posted 01-22-2012 10:21 PM      Profile for LeBarryboat   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have noticed a trend, where an Italian or Greek captain was the first to leave a sinking passenger ship. Oceanos...the Captain was among the first to leave the ship and quoted as saying he was organizing a rescue operation from shore. What ever became of that captain? (Royal Pacific - ex MV Empress) sank near Singapore after being hit by a fishing trawler, the captain and his officers were the first to leave the ship by lifeboat. I recall there was a Greek ferry in 1999 or 2000 where fifty people died, and the captain was among the first to leave the ship. The Sea Diamond's captain....what became of that?
Posts: 1911 | From: Minnesota | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ernst
First Class Passenger
Member # 5369

posted 01-23-2012 12:41 AM      Profile for Ernst   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by LeBarryboat:
I[...]The Sea Diamond's captain....what became of that?

The case of Sea Diamond is an excellent example how inappropriate such gossip can be - not to talk about the rather primitive prejudices you spread.

Just to get you up-to-date: It turned out that the charts were indeed faulty (I am however not sure whether this will change the conviction).


Posts: 9692 | From: Baden-Württemberg, Germany - originally from Vienna, Austria | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
LeBarryboat
First Class Passenger
Member # 5308

posted 01-23-2012 07:33 AM      Profile for LeBarryboat   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The case of Sea Diamond is an excellent example how inappropriate such gossip can be - not to talk about the rather primitive prejudices you spread.

It's not prejudice, there is a trend. I have worked under many different captains, and most of them I have great respect for regardless of nationality. On the Zenith we had an excellent captain who I respected very much. I think in some cases there is a "cultural arrogance" attached to the position of captain. My comments are not based on rumor, rather in some cases I've had direct experiences with some captains who have been proven to be sloppy in their seamanship.

Is there a law that says the captain must go down with his ship? I've heard the response that when a captain says "abandon ship" every man & woman for themselves....doesn't that release the captain to depart a sinking ship?

[ 01-23-2012: Message edited by: joe at travelpage ]


Posts: 1911 | From: Minnesota | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
desirod7
First Class Passenger
Member # 1626

posted 01-23-2012 07:53 AM      Profile for desirod7     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Ernst:

The case of Sea Diamond is an excellent example how inappropriate such gossip can be - not to talk about the rather primitive prejudices you spread.


Like button

Barry, you are going back to your old ways. Keep it up and nobody will grant you interviews and free cruises for the the Cruising Authority.


Posts: 5678 | From: Philadelphia, Pa [home of the SS United States] | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged
Ernst
First Class Passenger
Member # 5369

posted 01-23-2012 08:50 AM      Profile for Ernst   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by LeBarryboat:

It's not prejudice, there is a trend. [...]

Oh, I see. That makes of course a huge difference if we call it a trend. So it's a 'Greek-Italian' tend we talk about or should we lump together some other nations too?


Posts: 9692 | From: Baden-Württemberg, Germany - originally from Vienna, Austria | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Frosty 4
First Class Passenger
Member # 5826

posted 01-23-2012 10:45 AM      Profile for Frosty 4   Email Frosty 4   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here we go again!!! I would not like to be on a cruise with Ernie, Barry, and Ernst.
BTW I respect their views.
Frosty 4

Posts: 2450 | From: Illinois | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Johan
First Class Passenger
Member # 4458

posted 01-23-2012 05:56 PM      Profile for Johan   Email Johan   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Costa concordia accident seems to be an opportunity for the unearthing of all kinds of ethnic prejudices.
tonight it was reported on the website of a leading flemish daily, crew took bribes from "rich russians" from the First Class (!) to get in the lifeboats.

Will there be no end to this, but I think it is symptomatic for our age.

JI


Posts: 1890 | From: Antwerpen, Belgium | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
desirod7
First Class Passenger
Member # 1626

posted 01-24-2012 05:31 AM      Profile for desirod7     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/17/italian-ship-accident-stirs-memories-of-the-andrea-doria/

Cruise Ship Accident Stirs Thoughts of the Andrea Doria
By JAMES BARRON

Associated Press
The Andrea Doria after colliding with the Stockholm off the coast of Nantucket, July 25, 1956.

Gregorio Borgia/Associated Press
The Costa Concordia, which ran aground off the Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012.
First thing Saturday, Pierette Domenica Simpson’s boyfriend called and said, “Go online. You’ll be interested.”

She checked the headlines. Something about an Italian ocean liner in trouble. The way the ship was listing, the report that it was taking on water, the light from the cabins reflecting in the water, the passengers’ struggle to clamber into lifeboats — everything seemed so familiar. “I thought, ‘How can this be? It’s 56 years later,’ ” Ms. Simpson said.

For Ms. Simpson, the wreck of the Costa Concordia brought back memories of one of the most famous disasters in maritime history, an accident that she survived as a 9-year-old girl: The collision on July 25, 1956, that left the Italian ship Andrea Doria, bound for New York City, listing in the Atlantic after being struck by a Swedish ocean liner, the Stockholm.

“It was unreal and surreal, the fact that they were both leaning on the starboard side,” she said. “If you put the two photographs together of the night scene of the Concordia and the night scene of the Andrea Doria with the incline on the starboard side and the lights coming from the portholes, you cannot tell the difference.”

But there was a difference: “We were in the middle of the ocean. They were near shore, which was their demise. You’d think that would be their blessing.”

Crews pulled five more bodies from the wreckage of the Costa Concordia on Tuesday, bringing the death toll from that accident to at least 11. Prosecutors and the cruise line are blaming the captain for the wreck, saying he deviated from the ship’s plotted course, bringing it too close to the shoreline.

Ms. Simpson, who is 64 and lives in Novi, Mich., was immigrating with her grandparents, as she described in the book “Alive on the Andrea Doria! The Greatest Sea Rescue in History” (Morgan James Publishing, 2008). Even before the Concordia disaster, Ms. Simpson was working on a new book: “I Was Shipwrecked on the Andrea Doria! The Titanic of the 1950s.” “It’s a novel,” she said, and one of the characters is a 9-year-old girl.


Pierette Domenica Simpson recognized herself in film footage from the Ile de France, which rescued passengers from the Andrea Doria after it was hit by the Stockholm in the Atlantic in July 1956.
Ms. Simpson’s story was that she was rescued by the S.S. Ile de France, which sped to the scene and picked up more than 750 Andrea Doria passengers.

The Andrea Doria was on the next to the last day of a 10-day trip from Genoa, Italy, when it was hit. When it sank, nearly 11 hours later, a plane carrying a CBS News camera crew circled overhead. The correspondent Douglas Edwards, his nose against the window, described the Andrea Doria as “looking like a colorful but big and dead hippopotamus.”

The collision resulted in 51 deaths, 46 from the Andrea Doria and 5 from the Stockholm. Among the casualties on the Andrea Doria was Camille M. Cianfarra, a longtime foreign correspondent for The New York Times who was based in Madrid at the time. He was apparently thrown across his cabin, which was close to the Stockholm’s point of impact.

“When I hear the passengers from the Concordia talking about how they injured their legs just to crawl upward and get out,” Ms. Simpson said, “that’s what I found from interviewing my fellow survivors on the Andrea Doria and recalling what we had to do to get outside.”

“What seems to be different is we had an announcement shortly after the collision,” she said. “The captain ordered Officer Badano,” the second officer, “to make an announcement in English and Italian. It was such a staticky connection. We could only hear words like ‘calm’ and ‘life jackets.’ There was so much hysteria, we couldn’t really hear.”

Another difference, she said, was that the captain on the Andrea Doria sent out an S.O.S. almost immediately. “He ordered the lowering of the lifeboats,” she said, but the Andrea Doria was listing so badly that the lifeboats on the port side could not go down. Some passengers on the Concordia have described scenes of panic and confusion in their efforts to evacuate.

“The ones on the right side, they were out 20-some feet from the ship, so we could not board them,” she said. “They had to be dropped in the ocean, and we had to make our own way down there.”


Posts: 5678 | From: Philadelphia, Pa [home of the SS United States] | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged
desirod7
First Class Passenger
Member # 1626

posted 01-26-2012 07:25 PM      Profile for desirod7     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Costa Concordia eye witness account

http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/costa-concordia-eye-witness-accounts.html


Interview with Brandon Warrick

1. Could you give me an overview of yourselves?
My name is Brandon Warrick and I'm a senior Kinesiology major at UMass Amherst. I play club tennis there and I plan on going into grad school for Physical Therapy.

2. Why did you book passage on the Concordia?
My sister Amanda is studying abroad in Madrid for a year, so we decided to take a family cruise there and also stay in Madrid for a few days after.

3. When did you depart for your trip?
Evening of January 9th

4. What was the itinerary?
It was departure from Barcelona, then Mallorca, Cagliari, Palermo, Rome, Savona, Marseille, then back to Barcelona. Then Madrid for a week, but that was after the cruise.

5. Was this your first cruise?
Our first with Costa/Carnival, but our third overall. The first 2 were with Royal Caribbean.

6. What did you think of the ship when you boarded it? How would you describe the public rooms? Your cabin?
The ship wasn't bad, but I remember thinking it was no Royal Caribbean caliber ship. There was also way too much leniency on smoking. You could practically smoke anywhere. Overall the ship was average, but I would not call it a luxury cruise liner... Our cabin was a typical cruise ship cabin.

7. What were your cabin number assignments?
We were on the second floor, room 2412.

8. How did you occupy your time aboard the ship?
We explored the ship, had some drinks, went to the gym, and went to the formal dinners.

9. Did you make any friends aboard ship or were other acquaintances traveling with you?
Yes, but we became close friends with them because of the accident. It was just the three of us traveling together. We also became friends with one of the crew members who went on our tour in Sicily, Nicki.

10. What were you doing when the ship struck the rocks? What deck where you on?
We were on the 3rd deck for formal dinner.

11. Could you describe the noise?
We didn't hear much of a noise from the actual hit. We heard mostly dishes and glass crashing/breaking.

12. What was the aftermath? Was there an immediate list? Was there panic where you were?
There was panic everywhere, a lot of waiting and yes there was an immediate list.

13. Where did you go from there? Were you able to return to your cabins? If so, did you retrieve any personal items?
We couldn't retrieve much of our things because they told us that everything would be fixed in no time. I thought I could just come back to the cabin after going to the lobby to find out what happened, but that's when panic struck, so by then we had no time to head back.

14. Was there furniture thrown around or was everything still in order as you made your way to the muster station? Was the list noticeable? Did you see water flooding into the ship?
Everything in the stores on the ship had fallen. Pretty much everything that wasn't fastened to the ship fell. The list was very noticeable. At the very end, on our way to a lifeboat that had doubled back for us, the last corner we turned was a hallway with water rushing into it. Amanda fell into it because at that point the ship had tipped considerably more.

15. How would you describe the evacuation procedure? Did you stay in one place or did you try and find the best spot to board a lifeboat?
The evacuation "procedure" was non-existent. Picture being in the front of the crowd at a Tiesto concert, except with lifevests and people always trying to jump on stage and you have the evacuation procedure. We respected the unwritten law of women and children first, as well elderly people, and were one of the very few people not pushing or shoving anyone. We got into "line" for each lifeboat but they would all fill before we even got close because everyone would just fight for the front. The only time we ever got aggressive was when the panicking crowd would actually break my hold with my sister's hand or if my brother got separated too far behind. When there was risk of being separated, Adrian and I had no problem tossing people out of the way in order to get back together as a unit. As for trying to board lifeboats, we more or less just got in line and if we got on, we got on; but we didn't. I'd say we got turned down by about 5 or 6. It was pretty disheartening, but I mean we also had in mind the women/children/elderly people first unwritten rule and abided by it. We got to each one as fast as we could but they all had large crowds in front of them before we even got there. At one of the boats we actually got within 8 or so people from getting on and it really sucked to get the door closed on us when it was right there.

16. Was there a point when you went from thinking the ship would be ok to the ship was definitely going to sink? Were you thinking you might have to swim to shore?
No, because when the ship first tipped, it never recovered to the upright position, which I deduced as being stuck somehow. I just couldn't think of how an electrical problem could keep the cruise ship on its side. I considered the possibility of having to swim to shore, but it didn't really worry me.

18. How long from the striking of the rocks did it take you to get off the ship?
About 3 hours. We got to shore around midnight.

19. Could you describe how you escaped?
We were on the side of the ship that was higher in the air, and around midnight a few crew members came up and yelled for people to head to the lower end for the lifeboats that had doubled back to save more people. We held onto the railing and edged down the other because it was so steep. Then we took one more flight of stairs down, turned a corner and that's where we saw the water rushing in. We took a left, sprinted through the water, still holding onto a railing, and jumped onto a lifeboat.

20. What was the attitude of the crew and your fellow passengers? What did you think when you found out the Captain and his officers left before many of the passengers?
The crew was scrambling and doing the best they could to bring order to the passengers, but with no leadership (from the Captain abandoning ship) and no guidance or orders, they were nearly powerless. I was really disappointed in the passengers. It was quite pathetic watching everyone hurt each other and put each other at risk just to get onto a lifeboat. I also thought the captain and whoever left with him who was supposed to stay was pathetic and cowardly, of course.

21. Did you see the ship go over on its side?
Not completely, but it was certainly on its way to being on its side the last time i saw it.

22. Is it true the shipping line hasn't offered much help in getting to your destination or regarding lost luggage?
Regarding our lost luggage, we have literally no information. However, we received a lot of help getting to Rome and then to Barcelona where our parents were. They also got my sister a plane ticket home to states so she could see family and friends for a week or so (she was supposed to go back to school in Madrid) with only a day's notice, which I thought was impressive. Not only getting a hold of a ticket, but the prices are around $2500-3000 at such short notice.

Left: In the cabin donning lifebelts, right: at the muster station

23. Did you save anything from the ship? Room key? menu? any pictures or video?
We have a lot of pictures because of all the waiting we did after all the lifeboats were gone. I only saved my iPhone and my glasses because I'm almost legally blind without contacts/glasses. I really wish that they hadn't told us everything would be fine "in no time." I agree that they should have said something like an electrical failure was the problem, but they should have said "but just in case, pack your valuables" instead of basically guaranteeing us that everything was fine...

24. Would you ever sail again?
Yes, but not with Carnival or any other middle ground cruiseline. Royal Caribbean I would be totally fine sailing with again. Safety is truly their number one priority and you know it because of how thorough the practice drills are and the fact that they force every passenger to be there - they check your rooms, scan the whole boat, everything. Costa did nothing of the sort.

25. How has the disaster affected you?
I'm actually thankful for this disaster. It has really changed me for the better and I have such a positive, happy perspective on life now. I'm cherishing every moment and I hope this change is permanent. Given the chance, I wouldn't change a thing if I knew it would change me this way.

26. Will you keep up with the official inquiry into the shipwreck?
Probably, but I'm probably not going to do much more than keep tabs.

The Costa Concordia
Photo by Darkroom Productions


Interview with Amanda Warrick

1. Could you give me an overview of yourselves?
My name is Amanda Warrick, I'm 18 years old from Braintree, MA

2. Why did you book passage on the Concordia?
I am currently studying abroad in Madrid, Spain for my freshman year of college and my family decided to come visit me for a couple of weeks.

3. When did you depart for your trip?
We departed the 9th of January, 2012

4. What was the itinerary?
Depart from Barcelona, then Palma de Mallorca, Cagliari, Palermo, Rome, Savona, and Marseille

5. Was this your first cruise?
Our first with Costa, but third all in all (the two others were with Royal Caribbean)

6. What did you think of the ship when you boarded it? How would you describe the public rooms? Your cabin?
Huge, haha. We actually didn't think the layout of the ship was very well done, getting around to different dining rooms, gym, etc was pretty confusing. The cabin was nice, though.

7. What were your cabin number assignments?
We were all in 2412. We were an outside cabin. It is currently under water.

Amanda Warwick's Costa Concordia Key

8. How did you occupy your time aboard the ship?
We didn't really spend much time on the ship other than eating our meals, using the gym, going to shows or the bars.

9. Did you make any friends aboard ship or were other acquaintances traveling with you?
We met a few other people, on excursions into the different ports, mostly American.

10. What were you doing when the ship struck the rocks? What deck where you on?
We were at dinner, in the middle of our 2nd course when the ship struck rocks. This was on deck 4

11. Could you describe the noise?
I couldn't actually hear the noise of the ship striking the rock, probably because we weren't close to it, but I just remember feeling the entire ship shake, tilt, and lights flicker.

12. What was the aftermath? Was there an immediate list? Was there panic where you were?
After the first tilt, no one panicked, they thought it was just rough seas, but after the second, when glasses and tables started falling, people got up and started to panic. No one knew what was going on, although while some were panicking, others were still sitting at their dinner tables, eating.

13. Where did you go from there? Were you able to return to your cabins? If so, did you retrieve any personal items?
After about 10 minutes of waiting for any information and not getting any, we decided on our own to return to our cabins and get our life jackets, just in case, since we saw others doing the same. At this point, we were doing this just as a precaution, we didn't think there would really be any need for them. Upon arrival at our room, I retrieved my laptop, camera, and my purse with my wallet, license, debit cards, etc. Adrian packed his backpack with the same items. Brandon, who thought he would be able to return to our cabin in case of an actual emergency since there was just a "technical difficulty" did not pack anything except his iPhone and iPod, wearing shorts and a tshirt.

14. Was there furniture thrown around or was everything still in order as you made your way to the muster station? Was the list noticeable? Did you see water flooding into the ship? As we passed stores on ship, glass display cases were smashed, clothes racks were fallen over, signs were also fallen over. At this point the list was definitely noticeable, noticeable since initial crash at dinner. At the muster stations, there was no water flooding in, the only time we saw water flooding in (probably the scariest part) was the very end at the decks where the lifeboats had come back for us.

15. How would you describe the evacuation procedure? Did you stay in one place or did you try and find the best spot to board a lifeboat?
Chaotic. Navigating the outside decks was difficult just because of the disregard people had for other people. Instead of doing anything to get to a lifeboat first, i.e. pushing, shoving, my brothers and I stayed calm, and just tried to get to each lifeboat accordingly, which is ultimately why we missed the initial ones and ended up having to wait about an hour and a half. The siren had 7 loud beeps followed by one long one. This was supposed to be what was known as the "abandon ship" signal.

16. Was there a point when you went from thinking the ship would be ok to the ship was definitely going to sink? Were you thinking you might have to swim to shore?
From the time we got outside to the decks and saw the chaos and people actually getting into lifeboats I knew that something was seriously wrong and that the boat was sinking. Everything from jumping off the side of the ship to swimming ashore went through my mind.

18. How long from the striking of the rocks did it take you to get off the ship?
About 3 hours total.



19. Could you describe how you escaped?
We were at the side of the ship highest from the water, waiting, and after about an hour and a half of standing there waiting for any kind of instruction, crew members started shouting at us to run to the other side of the ship. Holding onto the railings, my brothers and I started running through the ship, which was tilting at a dangerous angle, to get to the other side. I couldn't even tell what part of the ship we were on, it was so dark, and obviously I couldn't really pay attention, but all I know is we ran through a hallway, past a few staircases, always holding onto the railing. There was nothing blocking our path. We got to the side of the ship nearest to shore/sinking into the water and ran down a small set of stairs, slipped and fell into water that was flowing onto the deck. (It was) about knee-high deep. It didn't increase noticeably, but we never waited at that point, we were basically running across the deck, still holding onto the railing, otherwise we would have definitely slipped and fallen either against the outer railing or into the water (as there were some open spots)A crew member shouted for us to get to the side of the ship with the railing, and run down further to where a lifeboat would come to the side of the ship. We ran, briefly getting separated from Adrian for a minute (which was scary) and finally, a lifeboat came, the crew on the boat threw a rope and tied it to the railing, and the remaining passengers were helped onto the boat and we were off to the port.

20. What was the attitude of the crew and your fellow passengers? What did you think when you found out the Captain and his officers left before many of the passengers?
I have to commend the crew operating the boat on how efficient they were in getting to the ship and getting passengers off the Concordia. The crew on the cruise ship, although without the leadership of a captain, I felt did the best they could in handling the passengers and helping people. As far as doing their job, they did it well. The passengers were a different story. No one cared for anyone but themselves. It was basically a free for all and a competition to see who could get to the boats first. It's understandable that in a situation as this, people will panic and things won't go perfectly fine, but I feel that there could have been more order and more respect for one another.

Adrian, Brandon and Amanda in the lifeboat

21. Did you see the ship go over on its side?
Yes, while waiting at the port of Giglio for a few hours, all you could do was wait, and watch the ship slowly sink further into the water and more onto its side.

22. Is it true the shipping line hasn't offered much help in getting to your destination or regarding lost luggage?
The cruise ship line did a good job in arranging flights to where we needed to go, but we haven't heard any further information regarding lost luggage.

23. Did you save anything from the ship? Room key? menu? any pictures or video?
Yes. I have my room key, some receipts from excursions booked through the ship (some we weren't able to go on for obvious reasons), and I have a bunch of pictures on my dad's camera that I saved.

24. Would you ever sail again? Would you say it was like Titanic or is that too easy a comparison?
Yes, but not for a while! No, it was definitely just like Titanic!

25. How has the disaster affected you?
Given me a different perspective on life. I realize how much material things don't matter (sounds cliche, but trust me..it's true) and how much more family matters.

26. Will you keep up with the official inquiry into the shipwreck?
Yes. I mostly just want to see if there are any more people found on the ship/ how many are still missing.


Posts: 5678 | From: Philadelphia, Pa [home of the SS United States] | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged
desirod7
First Class Passenger
Member # 1626

posted 01-31-2012 05:27 AM      Profile for desirod7     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
http://current.com/shows/countdown/videos/bill-press-denounces-reince-priebus-for-comparing-obama-to-costa-concordia-captain

“Countdown” guest host Bill Press calls on Republicans to fire their National Committee chairman, Reince Priebus, for his comment comparing President Obama to the Costa Concordia cruise ship captain who abandoned ship when his vessel ran aground off the coast of Italy.


Posts: 5678 | From: Philadelphia, Pa [home of the SS United States] | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged

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